Saying “No” To Others

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All of us at one time or another has been inundated with requests to make this or that; something that would infringe on our time, with no payment offered or, if so, a minimal amount that would not even cover supplies.

First of all, I am crafty. I sew, knit, crochet, make cards, dabble in polymer clay, photograph, etc. I love doing different things. But over the years, I have learned that most folks are “gimmie pigs”. “Make me this or make me that” with no consideration as to how long it took or the cost involved. And the worst part, finding out that they failed to take care of it, even when you provided them with hand written care instructions.

So I have learned to say, “No”. Yes there are ways to say “No” very politely and ways to say “No” rudely. I fall somewhere in between. For the most part, if I know you, I will say “No” somewhat politely…”No, I am not able to do that.” No further explanation is given. If you press the point, you will get the annoyed stare and a repeat of the former statement. If you continue, you get to see a side of me that tends to scare the crap out of people.

My youngest has told me in the past that I am rude to people. This was in reference to door to door sales people trying to sell me AT&T Uverse, something I neither needed or wanted. Yes I was blunt when they asked if they could tell me about it, but they got the point and left. I consider door to door sales people rude and obnoxious. They knock on your door and demand your time, then expect to separate you from your money. They usually realize quickly they have knocked on the wrong door.

Anyway, over the years I’ve learned that I do not owe anyone a handmade item. I also do not owe anyone an explanation as to why I am saying “No”. “No” is a complete sentence.

Just to clarify things a bit, I do make things for people, but they are things I want to make, when I want to make them and they are usually gifts for Christmas.

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My Boxy Bag Photo Journey

For my friends who have gone to the Craftsy website and downloaded the pattern No Guts Boxy Bag (free), I am posting my photos of how I made the bag. I followed the directions exactly and they are well written. There are also plenty of photos with the pattern to help you complete your bag.

These are just for extra reference. There are quite a few. I have not included any instructions for cutting fabric as that comes with the pattern itself.

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Boxy Bag

Found a free pattern on Craftsy for a bag to carry your shampoo, conditioner, razors, soap, deodorant, undies, etc. in.

The instructions seemed a little confusing, but as one person stated, follow them exactly and your bag will turn out fine.

I cut out fabric for four bags…thinking ahead for Christmas. Anyway, I made one bag. It was relatively easy and only took a couple or so hours to complete.

It measures approximately 7 inches long, 5 inches wide and 4 inches deep. Here are some pictures for you.

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Fat Bird Pin Cushion

Last evening, I got creative with my sewing machine. I was wanting to do something that wouldn’t take too long to get done. So I searched through my patterns and found this:

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I pulled out the instruction sheets and the tissue pattern. I read over the instructions and then counted the pattern pieces to make sure they were all there.

I decided to make the fat bird in the bottom left corner of the photo. I did do a few things differently while making the bird. I did NOT put facing fabric in the wings or tail feathers. I DID sew the bottom of the wings down to make a sort of pocket on the sides of the birds. I chose to do a different beak instead of the one the pattern called for. And I added a hat as each bird seemed to be lacking something decorative. The hats are yo yo’s in complimentary colors to the bird, with green satin 1/4 wide ribbon.

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After sewing the birds together, I stuffed each with polyester fiberfill. I am surprised that they sit nicely. But if you have a problem with that, you can always glue on a small piece of wood that will stabilize the bird.

Naval Air Museum and Hubby

Yesterday, hubby and I went to the Naval Air Museum. We walked around for about 2 hours looking at the exhibits with rest stops sprinkled in there for hubby. He has a few conditions that limit his mobility. He still walks, but it’s slower and requires frequent rests.

But we enjoyed our visit. For lunch we stopped in at Captain D’s for some seafood.

Here are a few pictures for you to enjoy.

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My Fitbit One Tracker

Several months ago, I got a Fitbit One tracker to keep track of the number of steps I take on a daily basis. I set it up on my computer, and then downloaded the app to my smart phone. I find I check it frequently just to see how I have done with being active.

Initially, it was all I could do to get in 5000 steps a day. I was struggling to make 4000, let alone 5000. Then I started doing the C25K on the treadmill. That helped a lot. For awhile I was averaging 8000 steps a day, but I knew I had to increase it and strive to reach my goal of 10,000 steps a day. Well, I am doing that now. It’s easier to reach that goal on days I do the C25K. On my rest days, it is a little more difficult. So I am trying to do more on my C25K days to make my average be at 10,000 steps a day.

My next goal is 15,000 steps a day. I think as I increase the running time with the C25K program, that will be an achievable goal.

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I did make it to 15,000+ steps the other day. It took me all day to do it. My Fitbit said, “Yay! Champ! Next goal 20,000 steps.” Now tell me how does one get 20,000 steps in during the day? It was all I could do just to get to 15,000.